New old windows

Today marked the first full working day at the Oberhaus. Not surprisingly, the refurbishment of the B&B started with some clearing out. In the process, we stumbled across some old windows. At the moment, they are rather dull, but once the dust of the last few decades will be removed, they will be shiny again – especially the coloured windows on the left side of the picture.

These windows once were part of a garden hut situated in the garden in front of the Oberhaus. In typical Oberhaus fashion, they were not thrown away when the hut was torn down, and Rosmarie Bühler, Stefan’s mother, labelled them neatly to ensure people in the future will know where they stem from. The door of the torn down hut, which has inlaid coloured windows as well, was built into the tool shed next to the covered seating area in the garden. Two of the old double windows we will now restore and build them into the north wall of the seating area, which we will turn into a breakfast room. There, they will make an atmospheric contribution to the lighting of the room.

The windows on the right side of the picture come from the wash house below the courtyard in front of the Oberhaus. The refurbishment of the wash house is being planned at the moment. The vast room on the ground floor will be equipped with a kitchen and serve as a community room and breakfast room for the cold days of the year, when it will be too cold in the seating area breakfast room. Additionally, the reception of the bed & breakfast will be in this room, and the library of the Oberhaus will come to new life here as a book wall. Last but not least, the grand piano once purchased by Berta Bühler (the sister of Stefan’s grandfather) and by now in Stefan’s possession will find its new home in here.

Even though it is hard work to clean and restore the old windows with ten glass sections per casement each, we are thinking about building them into the wash house, because they have very nice proportions and fit well within our concept with their look. By reusing them, we could preserve the old and complete it with the new in good Oberhaus tradition.

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